Monthly Archives: May, 2017

A Second 30-Day Special Session Has Begun

May 23rd, 2017 Posted by blog 0 comments on “A Second 30-Day Special Session Has Begun”

This afternoon, Governor Inslee called the legislature into a second special session, immediately following the adjournment of the first. This means the negotiation of Washington’s 2-year operating budget will continue for another 30-day period, and pressure will be on elected officials to finalize the budget by June 30th in order to avoid a partial government shut down. 

As before, the legislation to renew the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program (MPCP) is considered Necessary to the Implementation of the Budget (NTIB) and thus remains on the negotiating table and in play during this special session. Programs like the MPCP are often negotiated behind closed doors, sometimes in the last days of session, so it’s likely that our campaign will be going down to the wire.


Call to Action:

It is imperative during these 30 days that we keep the film bill in the Olympia conversation. Please take this opportunity to write, email, call, (or even tweet at!) your legislators and ask them to ensure that the final budget includes an extension of the MPCP. 

If you’ve spoken with your legislators in the past, please reach out again and keep the dialogue alive. During this next month, it is absolutely critical for the Keep Film in WA campaign that the film professionals of Washington State let their advocacy for the MPCP be heard in Olympia. 

Faces of Film: Ron Leamon

May 18th, 2017 Posted by blog, Faces of Film 0 comments on “Faces of Film: Ron Leamon”

Welcome to the Keep Film in WA Series – The Faces of Film!

This series aims to shine a spotlight on the people behind the films of Washington State, using portraits of them at work to remind the public and legislators the lives (and livelihoods) that are at stake if the incentive program disappears on June 30. Along with each portrait, the cast or crew member will share in their own words the important role that the incentive has had in creating their career and why it is important to have a vibrant film industry in Washington State. We hope that these photographs serve as inspiration, and that you share your story with us (info@keepfilminwa.com) and social media (#keepfilminwa)—and most importantly with the elected officials that represent you in Olympia!

Name: Ronald Leamon

City: I live in Seattle and have since relocating here in 1987

Describe your work: Costume designer

Time in Industry: 37 years

Talk a little bit about your work

I provide the looks you see on all the on-camera talent. I’ve costume designed for film, television, commercials, and corporate industrials. I’ve also done personal styling for some of our well-known local corporate leaders. My budgets range from $1.5 million, for a mini series, to $2000, for a corporate video, and every dollar I spend, from socks to dry cleaning, goes back into the local economy.

What do you enjoy most about the work that you do? About being on set?

I love the hands-on nature of the work I do, the camaraderie of the film crew, and the joy I get from working in the local community.

How has the incentive program played a part in your career growth?

Because of the incentive being provided to the industry, my career continues to grow, in the sense of meeting new clients and new crew base. 

What kind of financial benefits have you seen or experienced in your greater community?

The film incentive can only mean increased sales in the local communities where filming takes place, and at the same time it keeps the industry crew base gainfully employed within their trained field.

What would you like legislators to know about the incentive renewal?

Renewing this legislation is not a tax burden or gift to the corporate world. It’s further investment in a constantly changing industry, which is contributing to the development of new technology within our own state.

What would happen with your film career and life if it were to go away?

My film career will continue to flourish, but in a different state. Though I would continue to live here, I would unfortunately be paying taxes and spending my film budget in another state.

Faces of Film: Peter Tiemann

May 17th, 2017 Posted by Faces of Film 0 comments on “Faces of Film: Peter Tiemann”

“I have been a stunt coordinator and performer for 17 years in Washington State. It has been my passion to help local filmmakers keep their talent safe while making their scripts come to life with the action they envisioned for their films, web series, music videos and other forms of media. I’ve maintained a 100% accident free, safe film set environment. I will be returning to Z Nation for my second season as the Effects Coordinator, and I can say that without the incentive here in Washington I would not have the opportunity to work with such a diverse group of professionals. Please help Keep Film in WA.”

– Peter Tiemann, Stunt Coordinator

Follow the Screens

May 16th, 2017 Posted by blog 0 comments on “Follow the Screens”

Just look around you and it’s hard to deny that screens have become a major presence in our lives. They’re around us in our homes, at school, and in the work place. 

And as we continue to consume this content, it’s important that elected officials take a step back and realize that content creation means job creation. Each piece of professionally produced content we consume is the result of hours of work from a team of people working behind the scenes: grips, gaffers, make up artists, actors, computer graphics artist, the list goes on. When our major Washington-based businesses use content to tell their story, they need a talented cast and crew to support the effort, and it’s the goal of the Keep Film in WA campaign to keep this work local.

The Motion Picture Competitiveness Program ensures a steady stream of in-state film production, which allows Washington to maintain a rich pool of film industry talent in residence. More in-state talent means more in-state content creation and more investment in communities across the state.

Speaking of digital content creation, this video was created by the talented students and faculty at the Seattle Film Institute, and encourages our elected officials to “Follow The Screens” to learn how content is part of our every day lives.

Call to Action:

Share this video across social media, and with your state legislators. Remind them that the enormous demand for digital content can and should mean jobs for in-state film production professionals, provided we do what it takes to support that industry. The Motion Picture Competitiveness Program (MPCP) keeps our talent local so that Washington businesses can create content right here at home!

Please send this public service announcement to your elected officials and ask them to help secure the future of state’s film industry by including the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program in the final budget.

It Happened at the State Capital

May 11th, 2017 Posted by blog, get informed 0 comments on “It Happened at the State Capital”

In our ongoing effort to keep the pressure on Olympia to include the film incentive in the final budget, we’re excited to publicly debut this year’s legislative movie poster! Elvis fans may note a striking resemblance to the poster for one of Washington State’s early claims to silver screen fame, It Happened at the World’s Fair. The difference? The starring roles on our posters go to the prime sponsors of the film bill, Randi Becker (2, R) and Marcus Riccelli (3, D). Look closer and you’ll see the credits are populated with many names of the legislators who’ve shown support for the bill. In Olympia, like in the film industry, it takes the commitment of a team to see a project through to completion. 

Earlier this month, the Keep Film in WA campaign hand delivered one of these posters to each and every legislator in Olympia! With our professional lobbying efforts hammering home the importance of the film bill, we thought we would add something new to the conversation with our legislative movie poster.

CALL TO ACTION:

Help us by sharing this eye-grabber across social media, with friends and film supporters. And while you’re at it, please take a few minutes and share this image with your legislators and ask them to support the renewal of the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program, set to expire on June 30 of this year (just over a month from now).

It has been made clear to our campaign that the only way the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program will get included in the final budget is if constituents reach out to their elected officials. Please use this poster as a vehicle to do so today!

Faces of Film: Joseph Reding

May 11th, 2017 Posted by blog, Faces of Film 0 comments on “Faces of Film: Joseph Reding”

Welcome to the Keep Film in WA Series – The Faces of Film!

This series aims to shine a spotlight on the people behind the films of Washington State, using portraits of them at work to remind the public and legislators the lives (and livelihoods) that are at stake if the incentive program disappears on June 30. Along with each portrait, the cast or crew member will share in their own words the important role that the incentive has had in creating their career and why it is important to have a vibrant film industry in Washington State. We hope that these photographs serve as inspiration, and that you share your story with us (info@keepfilminwa.com) and social media (#keepfilminwa)—and most importantly with the elected officials that represent you in Olympia!

Name: Joe Reding 

Town/city: Spokane, Washington

Describe your work: I am the Key Set Production Assistant for Z Nation. I am in charge of the other PA’s on set. Our goal is to make sure everyone has what they need throughout the day in order for production to run smoothly. We are to inform the cast and crew information given by our directors and first AD. 

Why is Washington State a great place to film?

Washington is a great place because it has all the different geography you could ever want to shoot any feature film or television series whether that be forest, desert, or even the city. You also get true seasons to suite any weather the script calls for. It snows in the winter time, is hot in the summer, crisp in the fall, and warm and rainy in the spring.  

What do you enjoy most about the work that you do? About being on set?

Each day is never the same. You’re always having new experiences on set. My favorite thing on set is being able to see and be apart of how a film or television episode is made. People do not realize how may people it takes to make an episode. You can spend hours shooting a three minute scene and it takes 70 people to make sure that it is perfected. 

What would you like legislators to know about the incentive renewal?

This incentive basically creates jobs for people here in Spokane and the state.  The incentive is what brings films and shows into the state. Without the incentive, a lot of people will lose work.  If we do not get the incentive renewal, I fear for what I would have to do with my career. I want to stay in Washington. I want film to grow and more television series to be filmed here. I love Washington State!

Photo Credit: Daniel Schaefer

House Lobby Day Cancelled on 5/17

May 11th, 2017 Posted by blog 0 comments on “House Lobby Day Cancelled on 5/17”

We learned today that House members will no longer be in Olympia on Wednesday, May 17th, so we have put our House Lobby Day on hold. Don’t despair though, there are still ways to act today!

The Keep Film in WA team is organizing a handful of meeting for key legislators. Do you live or work in one of our targeted districts?

District 3: Represents the heartland of the downtown Spokane area, extending to the North Side and South Hill.

District 38: Represents part of Snohomish County including Everett, Marysville and Tulalip.

District 47: Represents part of southeast King County including part of Kent, Covington and Auburn.

District 48: Represents part of King County including part of Bellevue, Kirkland, Redmond, and all of Medina, Clyde Hill, Yarrow Point and Hunts Point.

If you live in one of these districts and would like to participate in these very important meetings, please email Washington Filmworks Executive Director Amy Lillard at Amy@WashingtonFilmworks.org.

It has been made clear to the Keep Film in WA campaign that the only way the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program will get included in the final budget is if constituents reach out to their elected officials. If you aren’t in one of the districts listed above, don’t let that stop you. Please write and call your Senator and Representatives and ask that the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program get included in the final budget.

Faces of Film: Hummie Mann

May 10th, 2017 Posted by Faces of Film 0 comments on “Faces of Film: Hummie Mann”

“I wear two hats as part of the film industry—I am a composer of film scores and I teach people to compose music for films. Even though I live in Seattle, my music is heard around the world. I made the choice to make Seattle my home and want to be able to maintain a creative career here. Through my teaching, I train tomorrow’s film and video composers. Many of them have to relocate after completing the training because there simply is not enough work locally, so I am behind any government efforts to help support and grow the Washington film industry so that more of our local talented individuals can make a living through making films.”

– Hummie Mann

Faces of Film: Melinda Raebyne

May 5th, 2017 Posted by Faces of Film 0 comments on “Faces of Film: Melinda Raebyne”

“Washington state is blessed to have a very talented group of people in the film industry here, both those who work in front of the camera and behind it. However, if the state doesn’t get the much-needed incentive, these resources will go to other states that understand the importance of supporting the film industry. I recently finished shooting my short film that looks at mental trauma brought on by domestic violence. I would not have been able to make this film without the various sources of support that are currently available to me as a filmmaker in WA state, and because of this support I was also able to get some big businesses to donate to my film, one of which was Verizon.”

– Melinda Raebyne

District 33: M.O.P.Z.

May 5th, 2017 Posted by Production Spotlight 0 comments on “District 33: M.O.P.Z.”

“We love to bring projects, like Adult Swim/Cartoon Network’s M.O.P.Z., to Washington to work with our talented local crew and share with them all that the state has to offer. It’s great that these kinds of projects get national distribution and we are so pleased that M.O.P.Z. brought director Todd Rohal back to the state for another production.”

– Lacey Leavitt, Executive Producer, M.O.P.Z.